Review: Vegan Tyne Cheese

Review: Vegan Tyne Cheese

Welcomingly Parisienne, the packaging of this cheese should have been a sign of what was to come. Each cheese medallion beautifully wrapped and placed in a circular box; of the kind made iconic by Brie, Camembert and ‘visit France’ television adverts, you know the one: strategically positioned on a red...

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Pierre Bonnard: The Colour of Memory at Tate Modern

Pierre Bonnard: The Colour of Memory at Tate Modern

  Immerse yourself in the gloriously colourful world of Pierre Bonnard and bask in the warm sunny afternoons on the Côte d’Azur or gaze out of the window at the lush garden from the coolness of the dining room. Sit with him and his family around the kitchen table spread...

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Prototyping in Tokyo at Japan House

Prototyping in Tokyo at Japan House

In the Christmas edition of Private Eye, there is their annual double page Gnome Christmas Giftmart, featuring such indispensable items as a ‘Solar-powered Trouser-press’, which can only be used outside in daylight hours, a ‘Driverless Suitcase,’ and an HS2 StairLift, which can shave up to 10 seconds off your upstairs...

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Ashurbanipal,  King of the World at the British Museum

Ashurbanipal, King of the World at the British Museum

I am Ashurbanipal, King of the World, King of Assyria.                          ” Forget Death and feed life”            ( Ancient Mesopotamian Inscription from Nineveh)   ” I am Ashurbanipal, King of the World, King of Assyria”, claimed Ashurbanipal himself in a cuneiform inscription. It would appear from archaeological  evidence and...

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Alfred Munnings: War Artist, 1918 at the National Army Museum

Alfred Munnings: War Artist, 1918 at the National Army Museum

  Alfred Munnings had more than his share of drama in his long and colourful life, regarded by Augustus John as ‘greater than Stubbs. He made it move, had greater narrative quality and his groupings are better.’ He certainly had colossal painterly skills, a unique palette and, as a rider...

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Shrouds of the Somme at the Queen Elizabeth Olympic Park

Shrouds of the Somme at the Queen Elizabeth Olympic Park

The artist Rob Heard has devised possibly the most graphic way of commemorating the dead in the First World War. His astonishing Shrouds of the Somme comprises a staggering 72,396 miniature corpses, each one wrapped in a calico shroud and strapped head and toe, and each one representing a body...

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Paula Rego: From Mind to Hand

Paula Rego: From Mind to Hand

  Paula Rego grew up under the anti-communist Catholic dictatorship of Salazar’s corporatism Estado Novo in Portugal, with shadows of the secret police around every corner. It is hardly surprising that her images resonate with menace, ambiguity and the threat or actuality of violence. The Maids is a painting based...

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Review: A Funny Thing Happened on the way to Gynaecologic Oncology Unit at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center of New York

Review: A Funny Thing Happened on the way to Gynaecologic Oncology Unit at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center of New York

Finborough Theatre, 118 Finborough Rd,  London SW10 9ED Until Saturday 27 October Tickets: https://www.finboroughtheatre.co.uk/productions/2018/a-funny-thing-happened.php   Frankly it would be amiss of me to start a review of this play without addressing its interminable title. Perhaps there is something our American friends find hilarious about it that got lost somewhere on...

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The Taming Of The Shrew at Tristan Bates Theatre

The Taming Of The Shrew at Tristan Bates Theatre

Considering the hundreds of years that separate us from the Bard’s heyday, it only seems that Shakespeare is becoming more relevant to the modern audience. There is not a play in his folios, that has not be re-cut, re-imagined and altogether changed in meaning beyond the Elizabethan playwrights wildest imaginings....

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Christian Marclay: The Clock at the Tate Modern

Christian Marclay: The Clock at the Tate Modern

Christian Marclay: The Clock Tate Modern Until 20 January 2019 Free admission   Fictional time is nothing but trickery. Bending the realities of time is at the heart of any good narrative, not least in cinema, where days, weeks, months – even years – are neatly condensed into palatable 90-minute...

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