Too Old To Die Young: Nicholas Winding Refn and the strange rebirth of the auteur

Too Old To Die Young: Nicholas Winding Refn and the strange rebirth of the auteur

The established wisdom is that auteur driven cinema went out with the binary 1-2 punch of Heaven’s Gate and Star Wars. Heaven’s  Gate was the foundering of the old New Hollywood ideal, unthinkable millions spent on an hours long artistic vision that nobody wanted to watch, whilst Star Wars was...

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Beyond the Road at the Saatchi Gallery

Beyond the Road at the Saatchi Gallery

Presumably when the Gregorian chant first exploded onto the theological music scene in the 11th century, there were plenty of old monks moodily complaining about how these young monks were slaves to cynical marketing. Sentiments like ‘it’s not even music; the Old Roman Chant was a proper liturgical plainchant repertory,...

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Dinner is Coming at the Waterloo Vaults

Dinner is Coming at the Waterloo Vaults

Looking back with the benefit of hindsight, Game Of Thrones was more than just a ratings juggernaut. Even as the quality became more erratic from about the 5th season onwards, the show’s viewership continued to grow in a manner more reminiscent of bubonic plague than word of...

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Deadwood: Seasons 1-3, a retrospective

Deadwood: Seasons 1-3, a retrospective

We’ve been living in the so-called ‘Golden Age of Television’ for so long now that it’s become almost tiring. The endless variety of prestige quality series has become numbing rather than exciting; there’s only so much time and attention the average viewer has to bestow and so you have to...

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The War of the Worlds Immersive Experience

The War of the Worlds Immersive Experience

H.G. Wells was one of the foremost writers of science fiction in history, stories like The Time Machine, The Invisible Man and perhaps his most famous novel The War of The Worlds would go on to codify many of the foundational tropes of the genre. In his stories he predicted...

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Writing: Making Your Mark at the British Library

Writing: Making Your Mark at the British Library

The more integral something is to our daily existence, the easier it is to take it for granted. After all no one’s hobby list includes ‘respiration’, and so among mankind’s achievements the written word is often treated like something of a red-headed step-child.This is not a grumpy accusation that no-one...

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The Glass Piano at the Coronet Theatre

The Glass Piano at the Coronet Theatre

It’s perhaps telling that not even rampant monarchists believe in the concept of the inherent superiority of royalty anymore. Whether they believe that they serve as a counterbalance to government, or just because you like the parades, no-one is going around sincerely believing that what rattles around in the royal...

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Death of the Author: Victor Hugo

Death of the Author: Victor Hugo

To complement our retrospective on ‘Les Miserables’ our second ‘Death of the Author’ features the larger than life self-regarding genius of Victor Hugo Whilst it is ‘Les Miserables’ that truly cemented his reputation, at the time of its release Hugo’s fame had already reached something equivalent to Beatlemania. The advance...

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The Twilight Zone at the Ambassador’s Theatre

The Twilight Zone at the Ambassador’s Theatre

  ‘The Twilight Zone’ originally ran (in flickering black and white naturally) from 1959-1964. For many of the original audience, Rod Serling’s twist-happy morality tales were their first introduction to science fiction. Whilst ‘Twilight Zone’ took some cues from earlier 50s genre works like ‘Tales of Tomorrow’! and ‘Dimension X’,...

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The Idiot at the Coronet

The Idiot at the Coronet

Fyodor Dostoyevsky’s The Idiot was published in 1864 and is frequently held up as one of the artistic high points of the Russian literary boom of the 19th century.  In the spirit of full disclosure, I have not read The Idiot, so I deemed it...

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