Children from poorer backgrounds are less likely to go to university

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Children from poorer backgrounds are less likely to go to university than their wealthier counterparts.

A recent government report shows that teenagers from poorer backgrounds are less likely to go to university and study A levels post-16.

The report shows that students who have similar GCSE results and who live in the same neighborhood, but come from a poorer background are less likely to study A levels that could get them into top universities.

The Social Mobility Commission’s report shows that only 24 percent of children that are eligible for free school meals will attend higher education. Where as 42 percent of their wealthier counterparts will attend university.

The report also showed that poorer children are twice as likely to drop out of school at 16 and are more than half as likely to study A levels. The research provides an insight into how the choices made by students aged 16 can have a deep impact on a child’s future and career.

“When low income young people from the same area with the same school results are progressing less than their better-off classmates, that is not about lack of ability. It is about lack of opportunity. The progression gap has many causes but it suggests something is going badly wrong in our education system,” said Chair of the Social Mobility Commission, Alan Milburn.

The report also revealed that for every one student from a poor background that gets into university, seven do not. Overall the research finds that a quarter of the progression gap is purely down to social background.

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