Introducing ‘Knocked’: My New Knee

Over the past five years, I have twice been told I needed a new knee. Off I trundled to consultants at the Chelsea & Westminster and separately to the National Orthopaedic Hospital. Because I was in no pain and could still do knee bends both consultants told me to come...

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Romeo & Juliet

The stage was set for the 468th performance of Romeo & Juliet by The Royal Ballet at The Royal Opera House.  It was very fitting that in the 50th Anniversary Year since Sir Kenneth MacMillan created his first full-length work for The Royal Ballet, this now timeless Classic opened the...

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World’s first climate change asylum seeker deported

New Zealand has deported a man seeking to be the world’s first ‘climate change refugee’. On Wednesday 23rd September Ioane Teitiota, 40, was flown back to the South Pacific nation of Kiribati, a low-lying island succumbing to rapidly rising sea levels, extreme weather conditions, and pollution. New Zealand’s highest court...

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Parliamentary Archives

In the era of Wikipedia it is easy to feel complacent about information. Any fact or statistic is just a lethargic Google away, but rather than utilising this hitherto unimaginable access to knowledge to better ourselves the mind can feel drowned by the sheer amount of information out there. The...

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World Ballet Day Live

Thursday 1 October, 11am – 4pm World Ballet Day Live returns this year on Thursday 1 October with 23 hours of footage from five of the world’s leading ballet companies; The Australian Ballet, Bolshoi Ballet, The Royal Ballet, The National Ballet of Canada, and San Francisco Ballet. The Royal Ballet...

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Trinity Hospice CEO wins ‘Rising Chief Executive’ award

on Friday 25 September, Royal Trinity Hospice’s Chief Executive Dallas Pounds beat for three other finalists to receive the award of ‘Rising Chief Executive’ at the Third Sector Awards ceremony. Two years after taking over the helm, Dallas was recognised for helping to make Trinity a leader in the hospice sector through...

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Chinatown

  Unlike many tourist hot-spots, Soho’s Chinatown is known as a destination for those seeking authenticity. Amongst the supermarkets and bakeries, this often translates to good food and infamous service. But the few blocks around Gerrard Street only sprung up in the 1950s. Prior to that, anyone looking for Eastern...

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From the Back Seat – Part 25

As a kid, France was more than just like L.P. Hartley’s past – it really was a foreign country, with strange smells, stranger cars, different food, totally different landscapes and hotel plumbing that sounded as though someone was banging the pipes with a hammer in the basement. They also drove...

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The Woodstock Music and Art Fair 1969

August marks the 46th anniversary of The Woodstock Music and Art Fair, Max Feldman explores how a bunch of hippie capitalists managed to seize the zeitgeist and define a generation. Woodstock (or The Woodstock Music and Art Fair to give it its proper name) occupies a venerable place in the...

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Soho’s hidden history

It feels somehow appropriate that Soho’s name derives from an ancient hunting cry, “Sooohooo”. The area’s fiery (and sometimes unprintable) history on the cutting edge of London style and culture has always been driven by people hunting for all manner of things. Nightlife, music, restaurants or something unprintable; there are...

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