Sorolla: Spanish Master of Light at the National Gallery

Sorolla: Spanish Master of Light at the National Gallery

This will be the first UK retrospective of the artist since 1908 when Sorolla himself mounted an exhibition at London’s Grafton Galleries where he was promoted as ‘The World’s Greatest Living Painter.’ Some claim! Considering that Gauguin, Matisse, Renoir and Degas were all still alive, and Picasso had already burst...

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Can’t take a joke? Jeez

Can’t take a joke? Jeez

When I was still young enough to be unable to tell the difference between pretension and cool, Tom Stoppard came to give a talk at my university. His slightly RP/Czech fusion drawl made me think of his comparative linguistic knowledge so in the Q&A, my hand went up. Eventually he...

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The Coronet

The Coronet

Fittingly for a theatre, Notting Hill’s The Coronet has had three distinct acts over its 120 year lifespan. In its present form the Coronet is a dark jewel on Notting Hill Gate, its long corridors festooned with evocative objet d’art and replete with one-of-a-kind theatre bar that fairly drips with...

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An Introduction to Barry Martin’s Chess

An Introduction to Barry Martin’s Chess

“All chess players are artists , but not all artists are chess players!” Thus spake Marcel Duchamp, the most influential artist of the twentieth century, outranking even Picasso and Dali in the scope of his effect on subsequent generations of aspiring Raphaels, Titians, Leonardos and Michelangelos. In popular estimation, Duchamp...

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Mantegna and Bellini at the National Gallery

Mantegna and Bellini at the National Gallery

The Bellini family were arguably the most important and influential of Italian painters in the second half of the 15th century, the head of which was Jacopo, who had a thriving studio in Venice and two sons, Gentile and Giovanni, both of whom excelled in the the art of painting,...

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Bridging the Borough Divide

Bridging the Borough Divide

As the Metropolitan Police reduces from 32 to 12 police units, Borough Commander Rob Jones has emerged as the new face of the Central West Command Unit Rob Jones did not always want to be a policeman. In fact, he did not know what he wanted to be. Upon graduating...

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The Unreasonable Woman: Emma Dent Coad MP

The Unreasonable Woman: Emma Dent Coad MP

Save for a few Liberal Party dalliances in the late nineteenth and early twentieth century, the Conservative Party reigned supreme for the better part of a century in South Kensington and Chelsea. North Kensington, conversely, pinballed around the political spectrum until it was abolished as a constituency in 1974. Thereafter,...

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Digital Gods versus Print

Digital Gods versus Print

KCW Today celebrates 7 years next month with the publication of its 72nd edition since its inception in May 2011. Last year our paper was shortlisted for Newspaper of the Year Award 2017. The title has grown in content, stature, and circulation and we are constantly amazed and delighted to...

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Democrafatigue

Democrafatigue

  It’s raining. I’m upstairs on the no. 49 to Clapham Junction in a humid breath fug. Two gents are sitting in front of me, “May 3rd. More bloody elections. Might as well move in to the voting booth I’m in there so often.” “Yeah.” “It’s bigger than most flats...

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From Life at the Royal Academy

From Life at the Royal Academy

From Life Royal Academy – The Sackler Gallery Until 11 March 2018 Admission £14 The Royal Academy Schools is not only the oldest art school in Britain, having taken in its first pupils in 1769, it is still one of the few art institutions that hold life drawing classes. As...

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